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15-18 October 2012

The scientific symposium “Mitigating impacts of fishing on pelagic ecosystems:towards eco system based management of tuna fisheries” will be held in Montpellier.
The symposium will have seven main thematic sessions:

  • Biodiversity and bycatch
  • Fish associated with FAD's: biology and behavior
  • Biology and ecology of pelagic sharks
  • Fishery impact
  • Time-area closures to mitigate bycatch
  • Mitigation techniques in longline fisheries
  • Mitigation techniques in purse seine fisheries

Around 70 oral presentations of results from novel research as well as recently published findings, updated reviews and syntheses, practical approaches to mitigation and management considerations will take place. In addition, five keynote speeches will open the conference and the thematic sessions.-          For any further information: http://ebfmtuna-2012.sciencesconf.org/
 
         

Click here to view the pdf

 

July 212 

Deliverable 6.2 of MADE, Good practices to reduce the mortality of sharks and rays caught incidentally by tropical tuna purse seiners, is out!

Prepared with the assistance of French skippers and crews who shared their experience and knowledge with the scientists, this illustrated practical guide can be downloaded here (7Mb).These handling/release guidelines, voluntary and nonbinding, are intended to promote good handling practices to avoid injuries to the crew when handling sharks and rays and to minimize physical trauma and stress of animals in order to improve their post-release survival. It provides "Dos" and "Don'ts" in order to show in an easy way the practices that should be avoided and practices that should be encouraged. This manual also provides basic information on the biology of sharks and rays and a description of the most common species encountered by the crews.”

 Click here to download

 

 

 

17 January 2012


 

The European Commission posted a press release on MADE, which has been picked up in dozen of websites so far…

 

 

28 November – 2 December 2011

 


Some participants to MADE presented their latest results at the symposium on Tuna fisheries and Fish Aggregating Devices in Tahiti (Tahiti FADs2011).
The abstracts can be found in the Book of Abstracts

 

 

October 2011


 

MADE latest results have been disseminated to the Working Party on Ecosystems and Bycatch of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission. Reports are available on IOTC website

 

 

12-16 September 2011

 

This year the annual Made project meeting has been held in Victoria (Seychelles),  at the Seychelles Fishing Authorities (SFA) headquarters.
37 participants representing the whole consortium have shared and discussed their latest results in order to prepare the last year of the project. They drafted a list of synthetic mitigation measures according to project results, to evaluate the economic efficiency of some of them (WP10) and to discuss them with stakeholders like fishermen in future meetings (WP3).

  
 

 

17-27 June 2011


A scientific cruise was organized by MADE and ISSF around the Seychelles 16-27 June 2011. The team visited 9 FADs (8 different FADs, with one being visited twice, 10 days apart) during the 11 day cruise, onboard the MV Maya’s Dugong (with presence of mercenaries for security to protect against Somali pirates). FADs belonged to both French and Spanish purse seiners who kindly informed the scientific team about the positions of their FADs in the area. Two main experiments were conducted during the cruise: studying the natural behavior of target and bycatch species around FADs (electronic tagging), and attraction experiments on sharks (to attract them away from FADs). In addition, underwater visual surveys were conducted under each FAD which provided information on the species composition and abundance of the various species around the FADs. The cruise also provided an opportunity to test the feasibility of using a simple and inexpensive underwater camera (GoPro) to assess the presence and abundance of sharks associated with a FAD.

 

  

FAD with MV Maya dugong in back ground

 

 Sharks attracted away from the FAD by the chum

 

February - April 2011

 

Between February and April 2011 members of the MADE team conducted three tagging missions in the waters around Mayotte.
The first two missions focused on tagging pelagic sharks, caught using  longlines, with MiniPAT and PAT tags. The third mission had a combined goal of satellite tagging of sharks caught on longlines and acoustic tagging of pelagic fishes around drifting FADs. During the three missions a total of 4 sharks ranging from 1.5 -3m in length (two blue sharks and two silky sharks) were tagged from longlines. Four FADs were visited during the third mission and sharks and fish were tagged around two of them. FADs were equipped with VR4-Global acoustic receivers. Five species were tagged including 17 oceanic triggerfish, 5 rainbow runners, 4 yellowfin tuna, 4 silky sharks and one oceanic whitetip shark. Many of these sharks were double tagged with both MiniPAT and acoustic tags.  

 

 


 

 

 

December 2010

 

An importan article about MADE project has been published on the annual report "International innovation"produced by research media. (See attached)

International Innovation is the leading global dissemination resource for the wider scientific, technology and research communities.

 



May 2010 

 

The MADE annual meeting was held at IMAR-DOP (Institute of Marine Research - Department of Oceanography and Fisheries) in Horta, from May 2 to May 5, 2010, preceded by two workshops from April 28 to May 1, 2010:

-   28-29 April 2010: WP8.3 & WP8.4 Workshop, Geolocation data and analyses of movements of animals (pop-up tags). Chairs: Yann Tremblay (IRD) and Todd Lindstrom (Wildlife Computers)

-   30 April-1 May 2010: WP8.1 Workshop, Spatial analyses of observers data to identify areas/seasons with high rates of bycatch. Chair: Pedro Afonso (IMAR DOP)

The first day of the MADE annual meeting (May 2, 2010) was organized as a mini project symposium to enhance internal communication  within the consortium, share results, questions and issues. The session began with formal welcomes from Mr Marcelo Pamplon, the Azorean Regional Government Secretariat for fisheries, and Ricardo Santos, Director of IMAR/DOP-UAc, which also gave the partecipants an overview of the mission and research at the institution. A total of 16presentations were done during this day with time for discussion.

The next days were devoted to session to write the scientific pars of the periodic report of Year 2 (May 1, 2009 - April 30, 2010), as well as the meeting of the Steering Committee (SC).

A total of 34 partecipants from all organisations involved in the project attended the meeting and the workshops, including 2 external experts.In order to study the behavior of fish at Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs), a scientific cruise was conducted from the 3rd to the 18th of March 2010 in the Mozambique Channel (Indian Ocean), with the participation of three institutes: IRD, SFA and AZTI. The Mozambique channel area was chosen for security reasons as it was thought to be outside the core area of Somalian pirates activities in the Indian Ocean. However, security was not guaranteed even outside the core piracy activity zone as an attack was reported on the 6th of March on a fishing vessel 60 miles north of the position of the vessel chartered by the team to conduct the scientific experiments.
 Thanks to the effective collaboration of the French and Spanish purse seiners fleets (who provided information on the locations of some of their FADs in the area), the team succeeded in tagging (with Vemco coded acoustic tags) a total of 50 fish of 6 different species around 3 FADs: skipjack, yellowfin and bigeye tuna, as well as silky sharks, oceanic triggerfish and rainbow runners. Using the the Vemco satellite acoustic receivers (VR4-Global) attached to these FADs, the team could collect key information on behavior of the tagged fish such as the time these fish spent associated to FADs as well as on their vertical behaviour. Echosounder buoys were also attached to the FADs, providing information on the biomass evolution of associated fauna underneath the FADs. Two small juvenile silky sharks were also double tagged using a coded tag as well as a mini pop-up tag (MiniPAT) from Wildlife Computers. One of the tagged sharks left the Mozambique Channel and moved to the  the Northern coast of Kenya 3 months after. The data is currently being analyzed in order to better assess the impacts of these FADs on the ecology of associated species.

 

 

March 2010

 

In order to study the behavior of fish at Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs), a scientific cruise was conducted from the 3rd to the 18th of March 2010 in the Mozambique Channel (Indian Ocean), with the participation of three institutes: IRD, SFA and AZTI. The Mozambique channel area was chosen for security reasons as it was thought to be outside the core area of Somalian pirates activities in the Indian Ocean. However, security was not guaranteed even outside the core piracy activity zone as an attack was reported on the 6th of March on a fishing vessel 60 miles north of the position of the vessel chartered by the team to conduct the scientific experiments.
 Thanks to the effective collaboration of the French and Spanish purse seiners fleets (who provided information on the locations of some of their FADs in the area), the team succeeded in tagging (with Vemco coded acoustic tags) a total of 50 fish of 6 different species around 3 FADs: skipjack, yellowfin and bigeye tuna, as well as silky sharks, oceanic triggerfish and rainbow runners. Using the the Vemco satellite acoustic receivers (VR4-Global) attached to these FADs, the team could collect key information on behavior of the tagged fish such as the time these fish spent associated to FADs as well as on their vertical behaviour. Echosounder buoys were also attached to the FADs, providing information on the biomass evolution of associated fauna underneath the FADs. Two small juvenile silky sharks were also double tagged using a coded tag as well as a mini pop-up tag (MiniPAT) from Wildlife Computers. One of the tagged sharks left the Mozambique Channel and moved to the  the Northern coast of Kenya 3 months after. The data is currently being analyzed in order to better assess the impacts of these FADs on the ecology of associated species.


a juvenile silky shark lifted onboard to be tagged with both a Vemco acoustic tag and Wildlife Computers miniPAT
  
A typical natural floating object found in the Mozambique Channel. Thousands of fish were found underneath this log.

 

February 2010

 

Shark tagging cruise in the Indian Ocean  In January/February 2010, in La Reunion (Indian Ocean), IRD and IMAR-DOP combined their efforts to deploy satellite tags on pelagic sharks: bluesharks (Prionace glauca), oceanic whitetip sharks (Carcharhinus longimanus) and silky sharks (Carcharhinus falciformis).A first set of daily experiments was conducted closer to the island’s shores, but none of those species was captured. The team then decided to head offshore in a 25 m Longliner, ‘Fournaise’, with a small tagging vessel on deck, the Chelonya. In spite of the rough sea conditions, which only allowed operation of the smaller boat on two occasions, the 8-day cruise allowed the team to tag 3 blue sharks, 1 silky shark and 1 oceanic white tip shark. Operations on deck proved to be an alternative successful tagging strategy, thanks to the help from the ‘Fournaise’ crew.

 


                        

December 2009

 

The azores team has finalized the target for blue shark tagging (21 sharks, 9 PATs, 12 SPOTs and 2 mini PATs). Also, it was able to successfully tag the first juvenile, undersized swordfish with a miniPAT.’



dec 09


November 2009

Four scientists of MADE (Laurent Dagorn IRD, Gala Moreno AZTI, Jacques Sacchi IFREMER and François Gerlotto IRD) attended a 4-day meeting in late November 2009 in Sukarietta (Spain). This meeting was organised by James Joseph, chairman of the ISSF (International Seafood Sustainability Foundation) Science Advisory Committee, and Susan Jackson, president of ISSF, with the help of AZTI. The ISSF is following through on a commitment to develop common best practices and facilitate global research to mitigate the impact of capturing non-target marine life (bycatch) in purse-seine tuna fisheries using fish aggregating devices (FADs). The objective of this meeting was to bring scientific experts and fishermen together to review the current knowledge of bycatch and research programs to aimed at its reduction.

 

30 November- 4 December 2009

An update of the project, with a special focus on activities conducted in the Indian Ocean, was presented by Laurent Dagorn during the Scientific Committee of the Indian Ocean Tuna Commission in Seychelle.

 

September 2009

 

The researchers from Aquastudio Research Institute monitored the landings of swordfish longlines in several Italian harbours (Isle of Ponza, Isle of Lipari, Marsala and Mazara del Vallo) covering the two most relevant areas for this fishery and collecting the size frequencies.At the same time, several fishing operations were observed on board at sea, particularly on swordfish longlines fishing in deep waters (300-400 m), to assess the full catch figure of this fishery, including the by-catch. During one of these fishery, on the 22 July 2009, in a deep-bottom area in the Ionian Sea, off the Eastern cost of Sicily, it was caught a rare specimen of Little sleeper shark (Somniosus rostratus, Risso, 1827). Fishing trials have been observed in the Tyrrhenian Sea, in the Ionian Sea, in the Strait of Sicily and in the Libyan Sea.The first mini-PATs tags on juvenile swordfish will be deployed in Autumn 2009 in the Italian areas.

 


september


rare specimen of shark Somniosus rostratus caught during monitoring activity in the Mediterranean sea



27-28-29 April 2009

 

The project consortium met at CRH-Séte-France.

 

 

March 2009

 

Tagging silky sharks with pop-up archival tags in the Indian Ocean (Seychelles)

 

 

march2009

February 2009

 

Tagging blue sharks with pop-up archival tags and ARGOS tags in the Atlantic Ocean (Azores)

 

 

January 2009

 

Tagging tuna with acoustic tags around FADs in the Indian Ocean (Maldives)

 

january_2009



October 2008

 

Pascal Bach (IRD) presented the project at IOTC Working Party on Ecosystems and Bycatch-Bangkok (Thailand)

 



28 September- 3 October 2008

 

Antonio Di Natale presented the project at  SCRS dell'ICCAT-Madrid (ES)

 



12-14  May 2008

 

The project had its kick off meeting at the Aquarium of Genoa-Italy.

 

kock off meeting